What The Sitting Rising Test Can Tell You About Your Health

What The Sitting Rising Test Can Tell You About Your Health

average health insuranceAt some point down the line, the average health insurance company will assess your overall health, physical wellness, and estimate about how long you may live and use that to determine your rate and/or the extent of your coverage. Of course, that raises questions about longevity and markers of health — namely, how can you tell? According to USA Today, a Brazilian doctor developed a simple test for people of all ages to quickly and fairly accurately gauge the state of their health.

Introducing The Sitting Rising Test (SRT)
How does the test work? Start with your legs crossed and lower yourself to the floor until you are sitting in a cross legged position. Try to do it without losing your balance, or using your hands, arms, or knees for additional support. Then try to get up again, also without losing your balance and supporting yourself with your hands, arms, or knees. Doing it perfectly — without touching your hand to the floor, touching your knee, placing a knee on the floor, or losing your balance — results in a score of 10. Any time you need to use your hand or knee as support, take off one point. Take off a half point every time you lose your balance. The test results can be pretty significant. “Score three or less and your risk of dying is five times greater over the next five years,” USA Today reports. People in good (or even excellent) health generally score eight to 10.

How Can This Impact The Average Health Insurance Plan And/Or Medical Billing?
The Affordable Care Act (ACA) may ultimately impact patient billing, medical billing and coding, and the typical health care facility quite a bit. Why? Whereas overall health and preexisting conditions once had a very real and sometimes alarming bearing on coverage, new law prohibits insurance companies from doing that — kind of. According to NPR, insurance companies may be able to get extensions on converting to the new policy (that is, get out of providing some insured care) and plans that are “grandfathered in” can legally make limitations for preexisting conditions and evidence of poor health.

Health plans are changing. The number of people who are uninsured (45.5 million as of 2012) has decreased drastically, over three-quarters (78%) of doctors have converted to electronic health records, and 46% now accept Medicaid. But things aren’t changing overnight. For now, questions like, “How healthy are you?” and “How long will you live?”continue to affect the average health insurance plan.